Monday, October 15th

EVENING PROGRAMS

5:30 – 7:00 pm
Dinner: Blackford Hall
 
 
7:00 – 7:15 pm
Introduction

Pamela-Hurst

Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, DO, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development; Stony Brook Medicine

 
7:15 – 7:45 pm
Keynote: The Future of Childhood and Technology

Pamela-Hurst

Justine Cassell, PhD, Human-Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University

What does the future hold for children and technology? We asked Dr. Cassell to open and frame the Digital Media and Developing Minds Congress by presenting insights into two general questions of broad interest. First, based on her extensive knowledge of current and emerging technologies, which ones are most strongly defining children’s media environments today and near-term? Second, in light of that assessment, what future technologies does she expect will re-shape children’s lives, how, and when? This fascinating talk will provide the audience with a shared starting point for their own conversations during the days that follow.

EARLY CHILDHOOD SESSION
7:45 – 8:15 pm
Keynote: Minding the Gap: Research on Digital Media Exposure in Early Childhood

James Griffin

James A. Griffin, PhD, Deputy Chief, Child Development and Behavior Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH)

A developmental lens will be employed to examine the state of research on the growing exposure of infants, toddlers and preschoolers to an array of digital media. Current knowledge gaps regarding the impact such exposure has on early cognitive and social-emotional development and learning will be explored as will promising directions for future research to address these gaps.

8:15 – 9:00 PM
Laps and Apps: Early Childhood and Parenting
Panelists

Dimitri A. Christakis

Moderator:
Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH, University of Washington; Seattle Children’s Institute

Rachel Barr

Rachel Barr, PhD, Georgetown Early Learning Project, Georgetown University

Sarah Coyne

Sarah Coyne, PhD, Department of Family Life, Brigham Young University

Kathy Hirsh-Pasek

Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek, PhD, Infant Language Laboratory, Temple University

This panel will address the current state and future directions of science related to young children’s use of media.

 
 

Tuesday, October 16th

7:30 – 9:00 am
Breakfast: Blackford Hall
 
 
9:00 – 9:05 am
Video Address

Kathy Hirsh-Pasek

U.S. Senator Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts

 

MORNING PROGRAMS

DIGITAL MEDIA, MENTAL HEALTH, AND RELATIONSHIPS SESSION
9:05 – 9:30 am
Keynote: Keeping Pace with Gen Z on Digital Media: An Inside Perspective

Jeremy Bailenson

Trisha Prabhu, ReThink; Student at Harvard University

Our digital world today is driven by its youth: members of the Generation Z who invented the selfie, created meme culture, and redefined the power of social media. To truly understand digital media and the way it’s impacting adolescents born into an era of technological growth, we need a teen perspective. In this keynote, 18-year old Harvard University student and budding social scientist Trisha Prabhu explores our society’s connection to digital media, its consequences for young people, and what it all means for the future of social media and digital interaction.

9:30 – 10:15 am
Digital Media, Mental Health, and Relationships
Panelists

Larry Rosen

Moderator:
Jennifer Stevens Aubrey, PhD, The University of Arizona

Larry Rosen

Larry Rosen, PhD, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Profile

Linda Charmaraman, PhD, Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College

Sarah-Lytle

Emily Weinstein, EdD, Postdoctoral Fellow at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education

This panel will examine the intersection of digital media and interpersonal relationships from a variety of research perspectives including the behavioral and neurological impact of social media on teens and preteens, intimate adolescent digital relationships, and the impact of texting on relationships.

10:15 – 11:00 am
Social Media, Depression, and Suicide
Panelists

Profile

Speaker and Moderator: Paul Weigle, MD, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Natchaug Hospital

Thomas Joiner

Thomas Joiner, PhD, Laboratory for the Study and Prevention of Suicide-Related Conditions and Behaviors, Florida State University

Profile

Ethan Kross, PhD, Emotion and Self Control Lab, University of Michigan

This panel will explore impact of social media habits on child and adolescent mental health, including depression and suicidality. Researchers and clinicians will review the current state of research knowledge as well as needed areas of future research, study tools and methodologies.

11:00 – 11:15 am
Break
11:15 – 12:00 pm
Digital Media for Health Promotion
Panelists

Vicky Rideout

Moderator:
Vicky Rideout, MA, VJR Consulting

Profile

Jennifer Manganello, PhD, MPH, School of Public Health, University at Albany

Profile

Michele Ybarra, PhD, MPH, Center for Innovative Public Health Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Profile

Sherry Emery, PhD, The National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago

How can young people’s love for digital media like texting, YouTube videos, apps, and social media be used to promote healthy behaviors? Whether the topic is vaping, the opioid epidemic, suicide prevention, safer sex, anxiety, or obesity, what are the most effective ways to leverage digital media as part of health promotion campaigns aimed at youth? This panel includes fresh data about teens’ use of digital health information and tools; examples of innovative uses of digital media for health promotion; an exploration of the role of e-health literacy as an important component of digital literacy; and a review of the methodological challenges involved in evaluating the effectiveness of digital health campaigns.

AFTERNOON PROGRAMS

11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Lunch: Blackford Hall
 
 
1:30 – 2:00 pm
Keynote: Fortifying Young Minds Against Misinformation

Profile

John Silva, MEd, NBCT, The News Literacy Project

Today’s information landscape is the most complicated and interconnected in human history. As students enter this ecosystem at younger and younger ages, they are engulfed by a rushing flood of information that they are not equipped to sort and evaluate. This session will address current research into the spread of misinformation (especially on social media), information consumption habits of young people, and efforts underway to teach students the evaluation skills that will enable them to become critical consumers of news and other information and to know how to sort fact from fiction in what they read, watch and hear every day.

2:00 – 2:45 pm
Emerging Technologies: Children’s Engagement with Intelligent and Interactive Media
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Jakki Bailey, PhD, School of Information, University of Texas at Austin

Profile

Patricia Greenfield, PhD, Children’s Digital Media Center, University of California Los Angeles

Profile

Rachel Severson, PhD, The Minds Laboratory, University of Montana

Profile

Mark Mon Williams, PhD, University of Leeds School of Psychology, UK

The panel will discuss the potential impact of emerging technologies like virtual reality, augmented reality, virtual assistants, and social robots on children and adolescents. Panelists will present their cutting-edge research to provide insights and best practices as they relate to child development.

2:45 – 3:00 pm
Break
DIGITAL AGGRESSION AND MEDIA VIOLENCE SESSION
3:00 – 3:45 pm
Panel: Cyberbullying: What Works, What Doesn’t, and Why Not
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Elizabeth Englander, PhD, Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center, Bridgewater State University

Profile

Dorothy Espelage, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Florida

Profile

Sara Konrath, PhD, Interdisciplinary Program on Empathy and Altruism Research, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

Profile

Tijana Milosevic, PhD, Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo, Norway

This panel will explore the state of the field of cyberbullying. What are the challenges facing the field? What programs exist, which programs appear to be effective, and what elements work best with youth?

3:45 – 4:30 pm
Modern Methods in the Study of Media Violence
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Douglas Gentile, PhD, Media Research Lab, Iowa State University

Profile

Craig Anderson, PhD, Center for the Study of Violence, Iowa State University

Sandra Calvert

Sandra Calvert, PhD, Children’s Media Center, Georgetown University

Tom Hummer

Tom Hummer, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine

This panel of experts will discuss many of the current best practices in the study of media violence. These include neuroimaging and meta-analysis, as well as what we now know not to do.

FLASH TALKS AND POSTER SESSION
4:30-5:00 pm:
Flash Talks

Tom Hummer

Dillon Browne, Psychology, University of Waterloo, Canada

“Environmental Risk, Screen Time, and Developmental Health: Examining Pathways of Association”

Profile

Sophia Choukas-Bradley, Psychology, University of Pittsburgh

“Social Media Self­-Objectification: Associations with Adolescents’ Body Image and Mental Health”

Tom Hummer

Meredith Gansner, Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance

“An Assessment of Digital Media-­related Admissions in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents”

Tom Hummer

Sheri Madigan, Psychology, University of Calgary, Canada

“Screen Time and Developmental Outcomes in Early Childhood: Investigating Direction of Effects with a Cross­-Lag Panel Analysis”

Profile

Teresia O’Connor, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine

“Family Level Assessment of Screen Use in the Home (FLASH): Development of an Automatic and Objective Assessment of Children’s Screen Use Across Platforms”

Tom Hummer

Karen Helffer, Ophthalmology, Drexel University College of Medicine

“Reduction of screen media viewing and increase in socially oriented activities in young children with ASD: A pilot study”

Profile

Travis Saunders, Applied Human Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, Canada

“Will Replacing Screen-­Based Sedentary Behaviours with Reading Influence Health and Behavioural Outcomes of
Students in Grades 5­-12?”

Profile

Tim Smith, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, London, UK

“High Toddler Touchscreen Use is Associated with Neural and Behavioural Differences in Attention Processing”

Tom Hummer

Clifford Sussman, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist; George Washington University, Washington, DC

“Choose Your Own Adventure: Motivational Interviewing for Online Addictions”

5:00 – 6:00 pm
Poster Session and Wine and Cheese Social
5:30 – 7:30 pm
Dinner: Blackford Hall

EVENING PROGRAMS

PROBLEMATIC INTERNET USE/GAMING ADDICTION SESSION
7:00 – 7:30 pm
Keynote: Imaging the Loss of Free Will in the Addicted Brain: Implications for Gaming and Internet Addictions

Profile

Anissa Abi-Dargham, M.D. Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook University

Various imaging modalities have been used to probe the molecular and functional characteristics of the brain in patients who suffer from addictions. These studies have shown that addictive behaviors involve profound depletions of dopamine in key regions of the cortico-basal ganglia circuitry, and changes in the function of these circuits. We will discuss the knowledge gained from these studies of substance use disorders and the emerging evidence from studies of internet addictions, to draw parallels between these conditions and outline future directions for research in this relatively newer disorder.

7:30 – 8:15 pm
Panel: Who Has a Problem With Internet Use? Screening for, Assessing and Diagnosing Internet and Gaming Addiction
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Marc Potenza, PhD, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine

Profile

Guilherme Borges, ScD, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatria, Mexico

Profile

Matthias Brand, PhD, Cognition Department, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

Profile

Hans-Jürgen Rumpf, PhD, Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Lübeck, Germany

The internet has changed many aspects of people’s lives, and this may be particularly relevant for individuals having been raised as “digital natives.” While there are many positive aspects of internet use, certain types and patterns of internet use may lead to significant problems at school or work, in relationships and other areas of life functioning. This panel will explore the topic of how best to identify, screen for, assess and diagnose internet use problems relating to gaming and other behaviors. The topics of how internet use behaviors and disorders were considered in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) and the eleventh edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) will be discussed, as will ongoing efforts to refine approaches to promote healthy development and improve public health in a rapidly changing digital environment.

8:15 – 9:00 pm
Clinical Solutions for the Youth of the Digital Age
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Nicholas Kardaras, LCSW-R, Launch House Digital Detox & Wellness Center and Maui Recovery

Profile

Hilarie Cash, PhD, LMHC, reSTART Center for Digital Technology Sustainability

Koh Young-Sam

Young-Sam Koh, PhD, College of General Education, Tongmyong University

Profile

Klaus Wölfling, PhD, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany

Profile

Kimberly Young, PhD, Center for Internet Addiction Recovery; St. Bonaventure University

This panel will discuss and explore the latest methodologies to treat screen-related issues. The panelists will examine the latest research related to the neurophysiological impacts of screens and what approaches the members of the panel have discovered to be the most effective – and why.

Wednesday, October 17th

7:30 – 9:00 am
Breakfast: Blackford Hall
 
 

MORNING PROGRAMS

9:00 – 9:30 am
Keynote: The Terminator and Spectator: Is Exposure to Media Violence Linked to Aggression and Violence in the Real World?

Profile

Brad Bushman, PhD, School of Communication, The Ohio State
University

Numerous experiments have found a causal link between exposure to violent media and aggression, both inside and outside of the lab. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have found a link between exposure to media violence and violent behavior, including violent criminal behavior. Exposure to violent media is not the only risk factor for aggressive and violent behavior, but it is an important one.

9:30 – 10:15 am
Panel: Digital Media and Developing Bodies
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Lauren Hale, PhD, Department of Family, Population, and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University Medicine

Profile

Cordelia Carter, MD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU School of Medicine

Profile

Monique LeBourgeois, PhD, Sleep and Development Laboratory, University of Colorado Boulder

Tom Robinson

Thomas Robinson, MD, MPH, Solutions Science Lab, Stanford University

Profile

Karla Zadnik, PhD, OD, College of Optometry, Ohio State University

In this panel, four scholars will discuss the short and long-term impact of digital media use on children and adolescents’ physical development, with a specific focus on study tools and methodologies. The expert panel will briefly describe what we know about how digital media use among youth affects orthopedic issues, vision, sleep and obesity. Each scholar will also present on methodological approaches and new research directions.

10:15 – 10:30 am
Break
10:30 – 11:15 am
National Studies
Panelists

Profile

Courtney Blackwell, PhD, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program

Profile

Michael Robb, PhD, Common Sense Media

Profile

Lindsay Squeglia, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina, Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study

This session will delve into large national studies of children and families, and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and methodologies, the media- and technology-related factors that influence children’s health and well-being, and opportunities for researchers to access existing datasets.

11:15 – 11:30 am
Flash Talks

Profile

Florence Breslin, Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa

“Screen Media Activity and Brain Structure in Youth: Evidence for Diverse Structural Correlation Networks from the ABCD Study”

Profile

Kathleen Roskos, Education & School Psychology, John Carroll University

“Effect of Independent Digital Reading on Primary Graders’ Reading Comprehension: A Longitudinal Study”

Profile

Nicole Zamanzadeh, Communication, University of California, Santa Barbara

“WIRED: The Impact of Media and Technology Use on Stress (Cortisol) and Inflammation (Interleukin IL-6) in Fast Paced Families”

11:30 – 12:00 pm
Tools and Methodologies Exhibitor Workshops and Demos

Exhibitors will showcase modern techniques for measuring children’s media use in three ten-minute hands-on workshops and demonstrations. Pre-registration preferred.

12:00 – 1:30 pm
Lunch: Blackford Hall

AFTERNOON PROGRAMS

COGNITION SESSION
1:30 – 2:00 pm
Keynote: The Cognition Crisis: The Perils and Promise of Technology and the Brain

Profile

Adam Gazzaley, PhD, MD, Neuroscape, University of California San Francisco

Dr. Gazzaley presents his latest perspectives on the difficulties we humans are currently facing in terms of our attention, perception, creativity, emotional regulation and compassion. What he refers to as a Cognition Crisis. Anxiety, depression, attention and memory deficits affect a half a billion people around the world with an economic toll in the trillions. And these numbers are rising, notably in our children. The relationship of this crisis to modern technology is becoming clearer. He concludes with a discussion of potential solutions using modern day technology.

2:00 – 2:45 pm
Panel: The Relationship between Cognition and Media Behavior
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Melina Uncapher, PhD, Education Program at Neuroscape, University of California San Francisco

Profile

Susanne Baumgartner, PhD, Amsterdam School of Communication Research, University of Amsterdam

Profile

Daphne Bavelier, PhD, Brain and Learning Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Profile

Jason Chein, PhD, Neurocognition Laboratory, Temple University

Steve Lee

Steve Lee, PhD, ADHD and Development Laboratory, University of California Los Angeles

Panelists will speak about the most current research on how media use is related to cognition: the impact of media multitasking, attention, executive functioning, long and short-term memory, and other aspects of developing mental processes. The panel will then discuss research-informed guidance on how to responsibly use media and technology.

2:45 – 3:15 pm
Keynote: How to Stop Technology From Destabilizing the World: The Digital Assault on the Human Mind

Profile

Tristan Harris, PhD, The Center for Humane Technology

Technology is destabilizing the world: exploiting the finite limits and vulnerabilities of the human mind and eroding our capacity to address our global challenges. Tristan Harris, Co-Founder of The Center for Humane Technology, will illuminate the existential threat posed by technology and share a framework for addressing this critically important challenge.

3:15 – 3:25 pm
Break
 
 
3:25 – 3:30 pm
Flash Talks

Profile

Ryan Foley, Psychology, Central Michigan University

“Addictive Phone Use and Academic Performance in U.S. Adolescents”

Profile

Jessica Mendoza, Psychology, The University of Alabama

“Can’t Keep My Eyes Off of You: When Smartphones Steal Attention During a Lecture”

3:30 – 4:15 pm
Panel: Cellphones in Schools

Profile

Moderator: Eric Dubow, PhD, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan; Bowling Green State University

Profile

Arnold Glass, PhD, Rutgers University

Profile

Madeleine George, PhD, Purdue University

An increasing number of schools are allowing cell phones in class and public spaces. Other schools are implementing bans on their use. Recently, France’s ban on mobile phones at schools took effect. What are the factors against or supporting the continued use of cell phones in the classroom? What is the evidence-based research on this topic?

4:15 – 5:00 pm
Technology and Laptops in Schools
Panelists

Profile

Moderator:
Anya Kamenetz, Education Correspondent for National Public Radio

Richard Halverson

Richard Halverson, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education

Profile

Carolyn Heinrich, PhD, Peabody College of Education and Human Development and College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University

Profile

Paul Hambleton, MA, Educator; Maine Department of Education

Panelists will discuss: (1) the learning science on the promise of digital technology in the classroom, including for self-directed learning, engagement, personalization, digital literacy, and more; (2) the social context driving the increased adoption of technology, including the interests of big tech companies and mandates on districts to both keep up with the times and do more with less; and (3) the reality (i.e., where theory meets practice), including unintended consequences of digital technology in the classroom.

5:00 – 5:15 pm
Break
5:15 – 5:45 pm
Keynote: Won’t Somebody Think of the Children?! Examining Privacy Behaviors of Mobile Apps at Scale

Profile

Serge Egelman, PhD, International Computer Science Institute; University of California Berkeley

In this talk, Dr. Egelman will describe recent research results about the privacy implications of children’s mobile apps: how they collect personal data, with whom they share it, and the pervasive tracking that occurs across apps and devices. Over half of the apps that his group has examined may even be violating federal law. Given that these practices are not widely known to consumers and companies go to great lengths to conceal them, parents are not left with many choices to preserve their kids’ privacy.

5:45 – 7:00 pm
Meet the Editors Mixer
Special Guests

Dimitri A. Christakis

Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH, University of Washington; Seattle Children’s Institute; Editor-in-Chief of JAMA Pediatrics

Zsolt Demetrovics

Zsolt Demetrovics, PhD, Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary;
Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Behavioral Addictions

Profile

Eric Dubow, PhD, Bowling Green State University; Editor-in-Chief of Developmental Psychology

Profile

Lauren Hale, PhD, Stony Brook University Medicine; Founding Editor-in-Chief of Sleep Health

Joanne Broder Sumerson

Joanne Broder Sumerson, PhD, Research Psychologist; Co-Founding Editor, Psychology of Popular Media Culture

Profile

Brenda Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN, Virtual Reality Medical Center; Interactive Media Institute; Editor-in-Chief of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

This session will bring together editors from some of the leading journals in pediatrics, psychiatry, psychology, physical health and more to share their insights into what they are looking for in terms of manuscripts, how to make research more compelling to their board, and to answer any questions attendees have with respect to all aspects of peer review and editorial decision making.

7:00 pm
Banquet Dinner:
Blackford Hall

Thursday, October 18th

7:30 – 9:00 am
Breakfast: Blackford Hall

MORNING PROGRAMS

9:00 – 9:20 am
Introduction

Profile

Facilitator:
Stephen Uzzo, PhD, New York Hall of Science

 
9:20 – 11:15 am
Workgroup Breakouts

This morning’s session is an occasion for interdisciplinary participants to address and explore two relevant challenges that have been identified at the intersection of science, medicine, social sciences, academia and public health. Pre-designated workgroup leaders and other invited guests will act as facilitators for each group, and groups will work on the posed questions in an effort to find solutions. Participants will choose a scribe within their group and be provided with supplies to describe their approaches. At the end, each team will provide a brief report out to all attendees. The results of this session will be made available to all attendees subsequent to the conference.

Team One: Research Studies and Methods

The first Digital Media and Developing Minds conference brought together the best and brightest scientists, researchers and clinicians in the emerging field of youth media effects and yielded a significant but broad national research agenda. In this session, interdisciplinary attendees will focus and extend their understanding, knowledge, and experience to the challenge of honing that agenda. The team will identify the most important, salient and current research gaps to be studied, and then explore methods for investigating and answering those questions, including what types of studies would make the most sense and what expertise will be needed.

Team Two: Media Screening Toolkit

Today’s medical professionals, mental health professionals and educators are often called upon to evaluate problem behaviors in youth which are caused or worsened by media use habits, but lack the tools to accurately and efficiently identify these increasingly common issues. In this session, participants will explore how we may develop an innovative suite of instruments for screening, monitoring, and measuring problematic screen media habits in toddlers, children and adolescents, such as addictive screen use, displacement of adequate sleep, exposure to inappropriate media content, overuse of social media, and engagement in inappropriate violent or sexual screen media that may relate to the problems for which patients present to the office or clinic. The team will brainstorm about new, updated screening tools needed to detect or assess mental disorders in youth or to be adapted to incorporate media-related questions, and characterize what they would be. In addition to their utility for clinicians and educators, these tools may also be valuable in helping researchers understand the relationship between mental health disorders and media use in children and adolescents. At the end of the session, participants will have the opportunity to join a workgroup to develop these tools and recommend others to support this project.

11:15 – 11:45 am
Workgroups Report Out
11:45 am – 12:00 pm
Closing Remarks

Pamela-Hurst

Pamela Hurst-Della Pietra, DO, Founder and President, Children and Screens: Institute of Digital Media and Child Development; Stony Brook Medicine

Dimitri A. Christakis

Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH, University of Washington; Seattle Children’s Institute